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Teach coding in kindergarten with this free to print candy corn stem challenge. It’s so simple, you can do this with your whole class- all you need is a bag of candy corn! Let’s go.

Before you print, you’ll need to understand how to teach coding in kindergarten and why on earth we’re going to use candy corn to do it. So read on.

kindergarten coding candy corn stem challenge

What is coding in kindergarten?

Can a 5 year old learn coding? Of course they can! Most of the coding we teach in kindergarten is called directional coding as opposed to block coding.

Directional coding is coding that is giving directions very simply, usually through a series of arrows. This can be done on the computer or in an unplugged coding activity, such as this one. 

In this hands-on candy corn STEM challenge, kids will be using the candy corn as arrows as they practice directional coding to get from start to finish. Then they’ll test out their code, to see if it works!

Why is coding important in kindergarten?

Coding may not be part of the learning standards now, but I know it will be! The world is shifting to be more and more technologically centered, and many future jobs or even hobbies may rely on the ability to code. 

When we start coding in kindergarten, we build these future skills that children will need. It's like learning a language; the earlier you begin, the more fluent you will be.

Some benefits of coding in kindergarten:

Unplugged coding activities are done without a computer, so many kids can participate at once, building skills they'll need on computers.

Avoid this common mistake kindergartners make while coding:

The most typical mistake I see when I am teaching directional coding to kindergartners is the addition of redundant codes. When you are coding, if your arrow points down, you will not need another arrow until you want to change directions.

You should never have two arrows in a row that are pointing the same way.

example of redundant vs correct coding in kindergarten

Candy Corn STEM Challenge Guide

Supplies needed for the Candy Corn STEM challenge:

Basics of coding to teach your kindergartners:

Directional coding is about using basic arrows to direct your token item where to go. Only use an arrow when you are changing directions.

The only directions for our candy corn to point are:

Remember: there is no diagonal pointing here!

Lesson Plan: Candy Corn Coding in Kindergarten

Objective:

Code a path from start to finish, using candy corn. Test out the candy corn code by following it with a token of choice.

Directions:

  1. Use your candy corn to make a path through the grid to get to the end. Candy corn can only point up, down, left, or right. Only use a candy corn to change directions.
  2. Place a candy corn in the first square to direct your token in the right direction. (This should be pointing right.)
  3. When you come to a block in the grid, you'll need to add a candy corn to code a new direction that avoids the block.
  4. Continue using candy corn arrows to avoid all objects and direct your token out of the path to the finish line.
  5. Once your code is complete, use your token and follow the code to see if it indeed, leads you out of the grid. This can be done with a partner as well.

Answer key/code:

There is more than one way to complete the coding challenge. Here are the photos of the possible correct answers. Remember to pin or bookmark this page so you can check the answers against your kiddos' or simply follow their path.

Want the bundle of 6 additional Candy Corn STEM Challenges?

If you feel especially passionate about kids coding, or even just want to make an independent center out of this activity, I've made a bundle of 6 black and white coding printables for you.

Each printable has 2 or more solutions so you'll have 12 additional directional coding activities to do with your kindergartners, along with your freebie.

Grab the bundle of 6 kindergarten printable coding worksheets for only $1.50. If you're looking for just the FREEBIE, just keep scrolling! : )

Just want the FREE Candy Corn STEM Challenge to teach coding in kindergarten? Here you go!

Looking for more candy corn and Halloween activities to do with your 4-6 year olds?

Check out our post of simply delightful Halloween activities for your leftover candy corn. Please follow and tag @forwardwithfun on social media if you share this activity!

addition halloween activities for kindergarten

The best kind of kindergarten STEM challenge is one that has children working together to find a solution to a fun, engaging problem using simple supplies that don't take lots of prep time. Enter The Floor is Lava STEM activity for kindergarteners. It's so simple, you can do it with preschoolers too!

Don't forget to download your free lesson plan pdf too, for easy access to this action-packed kindergarten STEM challenge.

*As an Amazon Associate, I may make a small commission based on any purchases you make through links on this page. Thank you.

kindergarten stem challenge

What is a STEM challenge anyway?

STEM stands for science, technology, engineering, and math. Sometimes you might see it as STEAM, in which the "a" stands for "Arts." In kindergarten, STEM challenges as kids to solve a problem in which there are multiple solutions and often children are required to build or make something with their hands. STEM challenges will require trial and error and combine elements of the 4 pillars: science, technology, engineering, math.

The Floor is Lava - The Best Kindergarten STEM challenge!

What's a better premise than The floor is lava? In this STEM challenge for kindergarteners, kids will work together to build a structure to save their bears (or any other small and numerous toy) from the lava.

Supplies you'll need:

My kids are already obsessed with this song, that could be used to really hook the kids into the premise.

Lesson plan for The Floor is Lava STEM challenge

Objective: kindergarten kids will work together to create a sturdy structure that holds as many bears as possible above the table top level using only the materials given to them.

Standards for math and science can be found below and are detailed in the free " target="_blank" rel="noreferrer noopener">downloadable lesson plan.

Download your STEM lesson plan now!

Step by step STEM Challenge directions:

Introduction and hook:

Part I:

the floor is lava part one of stem challenge for preschool and kindergarten
Use cups and popsicle sticks to save the bears!

Part II:

part two of the challenge index card addition
Add the index card and save even more bears!

Why should kindergarten include STEM challenges and STEM education?

Many of us adults wonder why STEM education is now all the rage, and others have never even heard of a STEM challenge before! There are so many incredible benefits of STEM challenges for young kids including:

stem education essential for young girls

Another benefit that doesn't seem right to just include as a bullet point is the benefit doing kindergarten STEM challenges with girls! Many women today were often told they'd be good at subjects stereotypically more "suitable for girls," like history and literature.

Very few women I knew entered the fields of math, engineering, and science, and those that did, were often treated by many like they didn't belong.

When we introduce the STEM subjects at a young age, kids will have a sense of ownership and belonging in these fields. All the kids benefit from these skills, but it is vital that our little girls also view themselves as scientists, mathematicians, and engineers when these fields have been historically male-dominated. The future is in our hands!

So don't wait to begin your kids' STEM education. Start with this kindergarten STEM challenge, and watch how quickly kids begin to think of themselves as engineers.

When introducing the concept of measurement to children, we always start with non standard measurement.

At the ages of 4-6, children understand the concept of short, long, taller, etc but they usually have no understanding of centimeters and inches, making those standard units of measurements too abstract for them.

So in preschool and kindergarten we introduce units of measurement that kids can really wrap their minds around. Usually those are regular household objects and toys.

Measuring is a practical skill that kids use when pouring water, comparing who had more cookies, determining who is taller, etc. In this activity kids delve in deeper to understand measurement of length and height with non standard units!

5 non standard measurement activities for kids

What's the difference between standard measurement and non standard measurement?

Though measuring length is usually the first thing that comes to mind when we think of measurement, there are actually multiple types of things we measure. Here are some of the standard units we use for these measurements:

Adults are used to pulling out a ruler, measuring cup, or using a scale to measure things. Usually we can visualize something close to a foot or a cup, if we needed to estimate. But children do not have that awareness yet, so instead teach them to measure with non-standard measurement unit.

These non-standard units can be anything but are best when the child selects them and are of high interest: shoes, lego pieces, stickers, race cars, etc. The one thing that they MUST be is uniform in size.

A child cannot measure their height in legos and markers! Instead one unit needs to be used at a time and lined up end to end, just as we would do when measuring with a ruler.

When do children begin to use standard measurement tools like rulers?

In the United States, the common core standards introduce standard measurement in second grade.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.2.MD.A.1
Measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes.

Before then, kids are expected to understand the concepts of measuring objects without using standard measurement tools, like in this first grade standard:

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.1.MD.A.2
Express the length of an object as a whole number of length units, by laying multiple copies of a shorter object (the length unit) end to end.

5 Ridiculously Fun Non Standard Measurement Activities for kids

In each of these activities, kids use objects instead of rulers to measure length. There are a few rules for measuring precisely that kids should follow when lining up their nonstandard units:

1. Measuring Me in Household Objects

Measuring Me in non standard measurement units

To play "Measuring Me," you'll need blue tape and access to items around the home that are (mostly) uniform in length. Some ideas are shoes, blocks, markers, crayons, envelopes, etc.

  1. Have your child lie down and mark their height with a length of blue tape.
  2. Ask them to pick out one type of object of uniform size to use as their non standard unit of measurement: their shoes, markers, race cars, envelopes, crayons, etc.
  3. Have them line up the items one by one along their length of blue tape. It's important that they practice placing objects end to end without gaps to get an accurate measurement.
  4. As they reach the end of lining up the objects, have them count the total number. They are that many markers or race cars tall!
  5. Try again with different objects, and make predictions on whether or not it'll take more or less of that new unit of measurement to span the blue tape.

While you have the blue tape out, check out TAPE SHAPES!

2. Snacktivity- Measuring My Foot and Hand

The non standard measurement unit for this activity is my favorite... snacks!

You can choose anything that is uniform in size, and I recommend items that are easy to line up end to end like pretzel sticks. Of course, a classic and fun snack to use is goldfish.

  1. Trace your child's hand and foot on a piece of paper, and determine which one is longer.
  2. Provide your child multiple types of snacks to measure their hand and foot with. Optional: draw a straight line from the top of their foot/hand outlines down to the bottom for more accurate measuring.
  3. Line up those snacks and start measuring. How many goldfish long is your foot? Your hand?
Hands measured in pretzel units

There may be opportunities to talk about halves or beginnings of fractions in case snacks don't line up exactly. You could also round up or round down...

Want another fun math snacktivity? You'll love PUNCH MATH!

3. Snowman Heights in Unifix Cubes

This is one of my favorite math centers for the winter. Kids love to see the family of snowmen and compare their heights from shortest to tallest before measuring them in unifix cubes.

Snowman heights with non standard measurement unifix cubes

4. Measuring Veggies with Bean Rulers- Pocketofpreschool.com

Student in this teacher's classroom measured and compared the lengths of different vegetables during a farming unit. Their teacher made them non standard bean rulers to practice measurement in a developmentally appropriate and fun fashion!

5. Crooked Paths Measurement- by Susan Jones Teaching

I love this simple yet genius measurement activity. Draw one straight line on a piece of paper and one crooked, anyway you choose. Have kids guess which is longer and then use paper clips to measure which one is longer.

susan Jones crooked paths activity

More Hands-on Learning for you...

Want a free week of hands-on learning activities that will wow your child? I'll send it right to you!


I think I traumatized one of my kindergarteners with my lesson plan on how to make a leprechaun trap.

Even 10 years later, his mother and I recount how she had to convince him leprechauns were not real, but he swore that they came to school and messed up our classroom. I'm so sorry, Dude! Just trying to do some engaging hands-on learning with the kiddos.
So be warned, that it might be a good idea to tell your child that maybe after all, it was you who tripped the trap after all.

*As an Amazon Affiliate I may make a small commission based on any items you purchase from links in this post, at no additional cost to you.

Let's make a leprechaun trap!

Before making the trap, you'll going to want to have a plan. What materials will you want to use? What object might lure a leprechaun into your trap?

This project involves so much learning from science to STEM to writing. In the first steps, kids will plan and prepare to build their leprechaun trap using my FREE How I'll Make My Leprechaun Trap printable.

how to make a leprechaun trap planning sheet

Download the printable and you're ready to make an easy leprechaun trap in minutes. If you don't have all the supplies listed on the left hand side, tell your child/students what you do have. You might want to show them the materials but not let them use them just yet.

Using the printable, have them draw a plan of what their trap will look like. What will they use to lure the leprechaun into the trap? Hopefully, something shiny!

For older kids who can already write, have them label their leprechaun trap plans so that the reader will know what materials they plan to use for which parts.

Ask your child/students, how will the leprechaun know to come to the trap. Will there be any signage to entice them to come inside?

Now let's build it!

Supplies you'll want to have handy:

st. patricks day stem supplies

While watching the kids build their leprechaun traps you might feel inclined to jump in and say, "Oh what about this? It would be cool if we..." but I encourage you to stop yourself and let this experiment be completely child led.

In the planning stages, we have provided the questions to provoke problem solving and the materials to inspire. This is the kids' part to be the engineers! Giving our children full creative freedom is hard, but it means that what they create is 100% their own.

Whenever I feel the urge to place value on my children's creation or make suggestions, I try to use the technique called "Say what you see." I just narrate what is happening. So instead of saying, "I love that little door you made," I might say, "You made a door out of paper." Sometimes I just try to step away and see what they'll come up with completely on their own!

These easy to make leprechaun traps will surely bring some excitement to your home or classroom. So now what do you do with them on St. Patrick's day?

child making a leprechaun trap

Setting and Springing your Leprechaun Traps

Leprechaun Trap ideas STEM freebie

The day before St. Patrick's day, I have the kids lay their traps wherever they think the leprechauns will be searching for gold and shiny goods. I make sure that they have their lure inside the trap.

Once I'm alone, I go and snag the gold coins/lures out of each trap.

This is the kicker, the piece de resistance, that probably really made my little student frightened: the footprints. Are you unsure of how to make little leprechaun footprints around your trap?
Easy! Get some green paint. Make a fist and paint the bottom side of your fist before gently stamping it across the surface of your choosing. Then dip your pointing finger in the green paint and create little toes over the foot print. Tada, adorable leprechaun footprints, and they couldn't have been made by an adults large feet!

So yeah, it's a good prank, but if your child or students are iffy on the subject, show them how you did it!!!

The kids will flip when they see the leprechauns have sprung their traps without being caught. This is usually when I leave a little note from the leprechauns saying something like, "You almost got me!" or "Try again next year!" If you're looking for some more St. Patricks Day STEM activities, especially for the classroom, check out The Stem Laboratory!

Leprechaun footprints with green paint

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